Category Archives: Education level

Aug 21 2014
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A Campaign to Keep Kids in School

This week, NewPublicHealth will run a series on new and creative public health campaigns that aim to improve the health of communities across the country through the use of public service announcements, infographics and more. Stay tuned to learn more about a new campaign each day.

It’s no secret that getting a better education is linked to having a longer, healthier life. But the flip side is also true: Habitual truancy—an excessive number of unexcused absences from school by a minor—has been identified as an early warning sign that kids could be headed toward delinquency; substance use and abuse; social isolation; early sexual intercourse; suicidal thoughts and attempts; and dropping out of high school, according to a 2009 report prepared for the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

That’s why Hawaii’s Truancy Reduction Demonstration Project and the College of Education, University of Hawaii, launched a series of public service advertisements (PSAs) to try to inspire kids to stay in school. The 30-second spots emphasize that school is where kids’ dreams grow; that education is a gift; and that teachers, families and students are together accountable for kids’ learning. 

Meanwhile, New York City launched the School Every Day Campaign to fight truancy, informing parents that students who miss 20 days of school or more in a single year have a significantly decreased chance of graduating from high school. The outdoor ads—created with support from the Ad Council and AT& T—address a hot topic, considering that one out of five public school students in New York City miss that much school in a given year.

Messages such as these really can make a difference. In 2006, the public school graduation rate in Spokane, Wash., was less than 60 percent; by 2013, it had leaped to nearly 80 percent, thanks largely to the “Priority Spokane campaign. A 2014 winner of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Culture of Health Prize, the campaign emphasizes education as a catalyst for better health and brighter futures.

“We’re using educational attainment as a lens for improving health,” said Alisa May, executive director of Project Spokane. “We’re beginning to see real signs of success in our work.”

Spokane County Commissioner Shelly O’Quinn agrees: “Spokane County’s focus on educational success and other areas is improving the health of our children. Healthy children become healthier students and adults, and everything we are doing now gives them the foundation they need to succeed after they graduate.”

Mar 5 2014
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The Shasta Promise: NewPublicHealth Q&A with Charlene Ramont and Tom Armelino

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In Shasta County, Calif., the Shasta County Health and Human Services Agency is using a County Rankings & Roadmaps grant to realize the “Shasta Promise,” which helps young people in the community prepare for success in any post-secondary school option so that they can obtain high-skill, high-income jobs that will yield long-term health benefits.

High poverty rates, low educational attainment and lack of employment opportunities are among the factors that make Shasta one of the least healthy counties in California. Only 19.7 percent of Shasta County’s adult population age 25 or older has a bachelor’s degree or higher, compared to 30.2 percent statewide. The goal of Shasta Promise is to increase awareness of and preparedness for post-secondary education. The program provides students in middle school, high school and college with the guidance and support they need to overcome barriers to pursuing higher education, and encourages a culture of college attendance among county residents.

To accomplish this, the county is implementing a newly-established College and Career Readiness Strategic Plan:

  • School leaders and counselors are being provided with a training curriculum and sessions to help them get students ready for college.
  • Parent focus groups are being convened to inform the development of an engagement plan between the schools and families.
  • Written policies are being developed for local colleges to accept all county students who meet enrollment requirement.
  • An agreement is being secured from Southern Oregon University to charge in-state tuition for Shasta County students who are admitted.

NewPublicHealth recently spoke with Charlene Ramont, a public health policy and program analyst with the Shasta County Health and Human Services Agency, and Tom Armelino, Shasta County’s Superintendent of Schools, about the Shasta Promise.

NewPublicHealth: What is the mission of the project?

Charlene Ramont: Our aim is to give every student, every option. We want all students, when they graduate from high school, to be prepared for all options post high school. When they graduate, they need to be prepared to join the military if they so choose, they need to be prepared to go to college if they so choose, they need to be prepared to go to a trade school or a certificate program.

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Jan 3 2014
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Public Health Campaign of the Month: Teach for America’s Health

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>>NewPublicHealth continues a new series to highlight some of the best public health education and outreach campaigns every month. Submit your ideas for Public Health Campaign of the Month to info@newPublichealth.org.

With only nine percent of current college students actively choosing teaching as a career, the Ad Council has launched a new PSA series to help recruit more students to join the ranks of educators. The need is critical. The worry: Half of all teachers are eligible to retire in the next decade, according to Ad Council research, leaving the potential for critical shortages for trained professionals across the United States.

Education is not just a rung to the best job possible—research shows that education is also critical for improving the health of individuals and communities. An infographic created last year by NewPublicHealth to showcase the goals of the National Prevention Strategy—a strategic plan across federal agencies to improve U.S. population health—illustrated key links between education and health, including:

  • Each additional year of schooling represents an 11 percent increase in income
  • The more years of education a mother attains, the more likely her infant is to survive and thrive

Some of the taglines of the PSA series, designed to appeal to both students and mid-career professionals, include:

  • I’m a teacher, I make more
  • You don’t need to be famous to be unforgettable
  • You wanted to be a teacher when you were 12 years old; it’s time to put it back on your list
Nov 6 2013
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The Connection Between High School Graduation and Health

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“For too long, we’ve thought of health as something that happens to you in a doctor’s office,” explained Howard Koh, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Health on Monday at the American Public Health Association (APHA) 2013 meeting. “We have about 20 leading health indicators that we look at closely, one of them is high school graduation.”

Koh went on to describe social efforts such as boosting graduation rates as among the most important things we can do to improve health for the future. He also discussed the important role that learning plays in being healthy—and that being healthy can also free kids up to focus and get a better education. The assistant secretary’s sentiments kicked off a panel on the indelible connection between the nation’s drop-out crisis and public health, and the ways in which we can achieve success in both.

Robert Balfanz of the Johns Hopkins School of Education began by describing the drop out epidemic: the overall graduation rate in the United States is as low as 78 percent and is far lower in some communities with the greatest inequities. In fact, one third of all schools produce 85 percent of the country’s drop outs. Chronic absenteeism, often related to student health, is the leading cause of the issue. For example, 25 percent of students in one city missed a year or more of schooling over a five-year period.

Health factors have a significant impact on academic success and graduation rates. According to Charles Basch of Teachers College at Columbia University, health issues such as poor vision, asthma and teen pregnancy inhibit student success, disproportionately so in children of urban, minority communities. Left unaddressed, these issues can form causal pathways to the increased likelihood of dropping out.

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Jul 25 2013
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Sonoma Aims for Healthiest County in Calif. By Addressing Education, Poverty: Q&A with Peter Rumble

Peter Rumble, Sonoma County Peter Rumble, Sonoma County

In 2011, Sonoma County in California established the division of Health Policy, Planning and Evaluation (HPPE) in an effort to move the county up in the County Health Rankings, toward a goal of becoming the healthiest in the state by 2020. As the director of the division, Peter Rumble, MPA, has played a critical role in the development of numerous programs and policy efforts to help create opportunities for everyone in Sonoma County to be healthy. Rumble has worked on programs and policies that go beyond traditional public health activities and aim to address the root causes of poor health, including the local food system, education and poverty.

Following his presentation at the International Making Cities Livable Conference, NewPublicHealth was able to speak with Rumble about the ways in which his work with HPPE is pushing to achieve health equity in Sonoma County. Rumble will soon move into a position as Deputy County Administrator of Community and Government Affairs for the County of Sonoma, where he plans to continue his commitment to a vision of health and quality of life for the county.

NewPublicHealth: Sonoma is making a concerted effort to help address the root causes of poor health, like poverty and lack of education. Tell us about some of those efforts.

Peter Rumble: Health Action is our real heartbeat of addressing social determinants of health, and it’s a roadmap for our vision of being the healthiest county in California by 2020. Health Action is a community council that advises the Board of Supervisors. There are 45 seats on the council, including elected officials, individual community leaders, nonprofit leaders, and representative from the business, financial, labor, media, transportation and environmental sectors. If you pick a name out of the hat for all of the sectors in the community, we’ve got somebody who either directly or tangentially represents that sector. That group began talking about needing to do something around health in 2007. 

If we’re going to be the healthiest county in California by 2020, what do we need to do to achieve our ten goals based on the best evidence available? We certainly have goals associated with the health system, but predominantly, we’re focused on influencing the determinants of health. Our first goal is related to education. We want all of our children to graduate from high school on time and ready to either enter a thriving workforce or go into college or a technical career academy.

file Community garden in Sonoma County (photo by Arlie Haig)

We started with some grassroots initiatives. Being a real strong agricultural community, iGROW was a good place to start. It was a movement to develop community gardens—for people to tear up their front lawns and plant a garden there, and increasing access to healthy food. That was a huge hit. We set a goal of a few hundred community gardens, and we’re up to a thousand now—it’s just caught fire.  

That was all great, but a community garden is not going to make us the healthiest county in California, right? You can see the beautiful posters out on shop windows, you can see your neighbor tore up their front lawn and is growing this beautiful zucchini and has an edible lawn now and all that’s wonderful, but we only have a graduation rate of 70 percent. We’ve got nearly one in four kids living in poverty by the federal poverty standards and if you look at what actually it takes to raise a family in Sonoma County, about half of all families can’t make ends meet. 

NPH: Does that surprise people to hear about Sonoma?

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May 29 2013
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Nominations Open for Girl Up Teen Advisors

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Sesuagno Mola of Ethiopia, married at five, never went to school and had her first child at 14. More children would have followed in quick succession, but Sesuagno got involved with a program in her town run by Girl Up developed by the UN Foundation that empowers young girls to create a life for themselves and their families well beyond poverty and illiteracy.

In Sesuagno’s case, she joined a program developed to help teach literacy, and provide information about family planning, gardening and life skills to help reduce food contamination.

Through the program, Sesuagno learned to build shelves to keep her family’s food off the floor, built a stove that sends the smoke out of the house instead of into her lungs—a cause of pneumonia and death for thousands of girls and women in the developing world—and jointly decided with her husband, because of her time in the program, that they would wait to have their next child.

“What we support are comprehensive services for adolescent services for girls to help improve access to health services, education and safe spaces,” says Andrea Austin, a spokesperson for the UN Foundation.

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Dec 4 2012
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Healthy Kids Lead to a Healthy Economy: Op-Ed

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A new op-ed in the Minneapolis Star Tribune makes clear the connection between improving the economy and improving public health — especially when it comes to children. One can’t be accomplished without the other, according to authors Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, the president and chief executive officer of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Arthur Rolnick, PhD, a senior fellow at the University of Minnesota and former senior vice president and director of research at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

By improving early education for kids — and even for parents before birth — we can dramatically improve the chances that kids will grow up to lead longer, healthier and more financially successful lives. This will benefit them individually and all of us collectively. The obstacle standing before public health officials and policymakers is to recognize this connection, the authors write.

“For many years, we have missed this connection because we tend to create policy in silos –with education under one roof, housing and economic development under another, and health under yet another roof. In reality, these policy areas are all interconnected and influence one another.”

>>Recommended reading: Read the full story.

>>Recommended viewing: Life Expectancy Disparities along I-94.

Also watch a video with Arthur Rolnick about the return on investment for investing in early childhood education.

Oct 29 2012
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APHA 2012: A Q&A with Stacey Stewart, President of United Way USA

file Stacey Stewart, United Way USA President

As thousands of people who are striving to improve health and health care convene in San Francisco, Calif., for the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting, RWJF is hosting brief interviews with thought leaders from across sectors. Brian Gallagher, President and CEO of United Way Worldwide, provided his thoughts on partnerships.

NewPublicHealth also spoke with Stacey Stewart, who was recently named to the new position of president of United Way USA. She was previously the executive Vice President, Community Impact Leadership and Learning at United Way Worldwide. Stewart shared her goals for UnitedWay USA, as well as what she's learned about the integral connections between education, income and health.

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Sep 7 2012
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United Way of North Central Florida on the Secret Ingredient for Successful Community Partnerships

Debbie Mason, United Way of North Central Florida Debbie Mason, United Way of North Central Florida

United Way of North Central Florida is focused on the building blocks that lead to a good quality of life – education, income and health – recognizing that communities are stronger when children are successful in school, families are financially stable and people are healthy. One of their primary roles is as a convener, to bring hundreds of organizations together across diverse sectors to set priorities and create change.

As part of our series looking at the work of United Ways across the nation in creating healthier communities, we spoke with Debbie Mason, President and CEO of the United Way of North Central Florida, and Mona Gil de Gibaja, Vice President of Community Impact, about their community planning process, strategies for effective partnerships, and the role of critical partners such as businesses and the local health department.

NewPublicHealth: What is the planning process you’re engaging in to set priorities around education, income and health?

Debbie Mason: Our major focus is education, but this is so inextricably linked to income and health. No matter where you start, you still wrap into the other two.

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Aug 28 2012
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Donald Yu of the Department of Education: National Prevention Strategy Q&A

Donald Yu Donald Yu (second from right), Department of Education, at a Green Ribbon ceremony with representatives of partner organizations

As the National Prevention Strategy is rolled out, NewPublicHealth will be speaking with Cabinet Secretaries, Agency directors and their designees to the Prevention Council about their prevention initiatives. Follow the series here.

We recently spoke with Donald Yu, Senior Counselor to the General Counsel of the U.S.Department of Education and designee to the National Prevention Council, about the connection between health and education.

>>Listen to a related podcast with the Secretary of the Department of Education, Arne Duncan.

NewPublicHealth: What is the connection between education, high school completion, employment and health?

Don Yu: Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has always said that education is the civil rights issue of our generation, and that concept has really infused all of our work in all of our areas. In terms of the question about how health relates to education, high school completion and employment, I think it’s intuitive but also backed up by emerging research that there is a strong correlation between good student health and improved performance on academic assessments. Obviously, if students are hungry they cannot focus in class; much less perform on a test. Or if they can’t see well, can’t see the blackboard, they obviously can’t learn as well, and my point about the civil rights issue is that those kinds of health disparities impact low income and minority communities the most.

NPH: And what are some of the initiatives and innovations already underway at the Department of Education to support the National Prevention Strategy?

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