Category Archives: Public and Community Health

Jan 23 2015
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Go Back to Basics, Go Back to Schools

Erin D. Maughan, PhD, MS, RN, APHN-BC, is director of research at the National Association of School Nurses and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellow (2013 Cohort).

Erin Maughan
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If we want to create a Culture of Health in America, a 2015 priority must be to focus on ways to break down the barriers that separate us and keep us from being as effective and efficient as possible. Currently, health care systems, education, housing, and public health work in siloes; they are funded in siloes, and workers are trained in siloes. Yet, people’s concerns and lives are not siloed and a community health culture/system cannot be either.  One of the places to begin coordinated cultural change is in schools.

Schools are a smart choice to target because nearly 98 percent of school-age children, in their formative years, attend school and schools provide access to families and neighborhood communities. The Department of Education’s Full-Service Community Schools Program and Whole School, Whole Child, Whole Community Initiative reminds us that, in order for children to be educated, they need to be healthy and there must be a connection between school and community.

There are many school health initiatives in place, such as healthy food choices, physical fitness, healthy policies, school health services, community support, and after-school programs. The potential is there—but so are the siloes. But when schools are appropriately staffed with school nurses, the nurses help break down the siloes; that is because school nurses are extensions of health care, education, and public health and thus can provide or coordinate efforts to ensure a holistic, resource efficient, healthy school community.

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Jan 21 2015
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Restoring Dignity to Those with Dementia

Judy Berry is the founder of Dementia Specialist Consulting and the Lakeview Ranch Model of Specialized Dementia Care in Darwin, Minn., and a 2010 recipient of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Community Health Leaders award.

Judy Berry
Aging in America

I live in rural Minnesota, and my passion is to make a significant contribution to improving dementia care in our society and to be an advocate for all seniors with dementia in their quest to maintain their basic human right to dignity, choice, and quality of life until their death.

My mother, Evelyn Holly, passed away 16 years ago. She spent the last seven years of her life being bounced from one nursing home or residential dementia facility to another, and in and out of hospital geri-psych units, all because of her so-called “challenging and aggressive behavior.” She spent the last year of her life strapped in a chair and drugged so she would be “compliant.” I imagine many of you have had similar experiences. Click on this link to view a video about my personal struggle with dementia care—a struggle that has fueled my passion to improve it.

After many years of heartache and frustration in my struggle to find appropriate care for my mother, and after being told repeatedly by others in the health care industry that the kind of dignified care that I visualized was impossible because it was too expensive, I discovered that I could not find any financial support for trying something different. I decided to use my own life savings to try to develop a model of specialized dementia care that would focus on the unmet emotional and spiritual needs of persons with dementia, many of whom are unable to communicate those needs, and to meet their physical needs as well.

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Jan 13 2015
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‘Glocalizing’ Solutions for the Rising Chronic Disease Epidemic

Justin List, MD, MAR, MSc, is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)/VA Clinical Scholar at the University of Michigan and primary care general internist at VA Ann Arbor Health System. His research interests include community health worker evaluation, social determinants of health, and improving how health systems address the prevention and management of non-communicable diseases.

Justin List

The emergency sirens sounded loudly for the rising burden of chronic disease in 2014. Chronic diseases, also called non-communicable diseases (NCDs), broadly include cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, cancer, and diabetes. In 2014, we learned that, overall, 40 percent of Americans born between 2000 and 2011 are projected to develop diabetes in their lifetimes. This is double the lifetime risk from those born just a decade earlier. Rates of obesity, a condition related to many NCDs, remains stubbornly high in the United States. Mortality and morbidity from NCDs, not to mention the social and economic costs of disease, continue to rise.

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The United States is not alone in the struggle with a well-entrenched NCD burden. At the end of 2014, a Council on Foreign Relations task force issued a report with a clarion call for the United States to aid in addressing NCDs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where the epidemic of chronic disease poses risks to communities, economies, and security. The task force, which included RWJF President & CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MPH, among its members, recommended: (1) U.S. global health funding priorities expand from disease-focused objectives to include more outcome-oriented measures for public health; and (2) the United States convene leading partners and stakeholders to address NCDs in LMICs.

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Jan 12 2015
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The Imperative to Collaborate Across Disciplines to Make It Easier to be Healthy

Chevy Williams, PhD, MPH, is a fellow at Experience Institute, where she is learning and applying design thinking to social problems. Williams is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Health & Society Scholars program at the University of Pennsylvania. 

Chevy Williams

Today, we can get access to just about anything in minutes or hours. Smartphones put a world of information literally at our fingertips. Within minutes, most of us can get food we want, entertainment we desire, even travel to another city. But seeing a doctor, an arguably more immediate need, is not so easy. Creating a Culture of Health requires our collective interdisciplinary expertise to make health and health care as accessible and user-friendly as other products and services we use on a regular basis.

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Before I left academia, I heard the word “interdisciplinary” tossed around a lot, but I saw it practiced in very safe ways. Typical research teams of grants I was on or would review comprised researchers from only the social, psychological, and health and medical sciences.  As public health faculty, I’d hear statements like “Public health is inherently interdisciplinary.” This may be true since public health draws from multiple disciplines, but I couldn’t help but feel that such statements were more a reflection of inertia than anything else.

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Jan 8 2015
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The Role of the Chief Nursing Officer in Bridging Gaps Among Health Systems and Communities to Improve Population Health

Jerry A. Mansfield, PhD, RN, is chief nursing officer at University Hospital and the Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital, and a clinical professor at Ohio State University College of Nursing. He is an alumnus of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Executive Nurse Fellows program.

Jerry Mansfield
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Since my doctoral work in public health, I have thought a great deal about the relationship of public health theory and practice and my acute care background. With more than 30 years of progressive leadership experience in a variety of for-profit/non-profit, inpatient and outpatient positions, I am trying to generate dialogue and discern a purposeful plan regarding the role of a Chief Nursing Officer in an academic medical center and the health of the populations we serve in our communities.

Based on earlier work in the 1990s and early 2000s, in 2007 the Health Research and Education Trust (HRET) engaged national experts to address the following question: How can hospitals engage their communities to improve the health of everyone? The report provides a framework and encourages hospital leaders and community members to envision health care in communities beyond the medical services offered by providers; it notes that the production of health is not only medical care, but also our environment, individual behavior, and genetic make-up.

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Dec 10 2014
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We Are All Tuskegee

Collins O. Airhihenbuwa, PhD, MPH, is professor and head of the Department of Biobehavioral Health at Penn State University. The first RWJF Scholars Forum: Disparities, Resilience, and Building a Culture of Health was held last week. The conversation continues here on the RWJF Human Capital Blog.

Scholars Forum 2014 Logo

As we address disparities and inequities, the challenge is to think about solutions and not simply defining the problem. Most would agree that health is the most important part of who we are. It is the first thing we think about in the morning when we greet one another by asking, “How are you this morning?” It is the last thing we think about at night when we wish someone a restful night.

Collins Airhihenbuwa

What may be different is what health means to us and our families. This is why place and context are important. How we think about health and what we choose to do about it is very much influenced by where we reside. Our place and related cultural differences about health are less about right or wrong and more about ways of relating and meeting expectations our families and communities may have of us, whether expressed or perceived. More than that is the way we relate to what our place means in terms of how it is defined and subsequently how that definition shapes how we define it for ourselves. In other words the ‘gate’ through which we talk about our place and ourselves is very important in having a conversation about who we are and what that means for our health.

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Nov 28 2014
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Lessons from the Arabbers of Baltimore

Maya M. Rockeymoore, PhD, is president of the Center for Global Policy Solutions, a nonprofit dedicated to making policy work for people and their environments, and director of Leadership for Healthy Communities, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). On December 5, RWJF will hold its first Scholars Forum: Disparities, Resilience, and Building a Culture of Health. Learn more.

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When I think of the resilience of disadvantaged communities disproportionately affected by health disparities, I think of the Arabbers of Baltimore, Md. They are not Arabic speaking people from the Middle East or North Africa, but scrappy African American entrepreneurs who started selling fresh foods in Baltimore’s underserved communities in the aftermath of the Civil War.

Maya Rockeymoore

Their relevance continued into the modern era as supermarkets divested from low-income neighborhoods, leaving struggling residents with few options aside from unhealthy fast food and carry-out restaurants. Driving horses with carts laden with colorful fresh fruits and vegetables, Arabbers sold their produce to residents literally starving for nutritious food.

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Nov 18 2014
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Research by RWJF Clinical Scholars Explores Antibiotic Overuse, Weight-Loss Smartphone Apps, More

New studies conducted by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholars and published as part of a special November supplement of the Annals of Internal Medicine offer fresh insights on a range of topics, including: How hospitals can improve antibiotic prescribing practices; how a simple change to the format of electronic health records can encourage the use of money-saving generic drugs; how a lottery-based incentive program for patients could increase participation in colon cancer screening; and whether a popular smartphone weight-loss app actually helps patients lose weight.

The supplement was published with the support of RWJF. Studies in the issue include:

Special Training for Physicians in Antibiotics Decreases Inappropriate Use and C. difficile Infections

With growing concerns about increasing antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been urging hospitals to adopt antibiotic “timeouts.” Nearly 50 percent of antibiotic use is unnecessary or inappropriate, according to the CDC, so what can hospitals and physicians do to ensure that antibiotics continue to be effective? The McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) in Montreal tested a simple approach: provide monthly in-person trainings for physicians and residents in appropriate antibiotic use and implement a weekly review of all patients receiving antibiotics. This approach decreased inappropriate antibiotic use and resulted in a mild decline in Clostridium difficile infections. “Our pilot program led to significant savings in the cost of antibiotics paid out of our hospital budget,” said RWJF Clinical Scholars alumna and Louise Pilote, MD, PhD, MPH, Chief of Internal Medicine at the MUHC and McGill University. “This is good news for anyone concerned about antibiotic effectiveness and reducing health care costs.”

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Nov 14 2014
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Are You Going to the American Public Health Association Meeting Next Week?

During this year’s American Public Health Association (APHA) Annual Meeting & Exposition, 10 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) grantees will give short talks at the first-ever RWJF Briefings @ the Booth on Monday, November 17 and Tuesday, November 18. Grantees from a variety of programs, representing numerous health and health care sectors, will share their insights on topics ranging from health literacy to obesity interventions to green building certification.

American Public Health Association Meeting & Expo

The briefings will take place at the RWJF exhibit space in the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center.

Grab a cup of coffee at the RWJF café and join a briefing! The schedule follows.

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Nov 13 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: EpiPens in schools, suicide prevention, financial incentives for wellness, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

A study by RWJF Physician Faculty Scholars alumna Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH, shows that keeping supplies of epinephrine, commonly known as EpiPens, in schools saves lives, Health Day reports. Epinephrine injections are given in response to life-threatening allergic reactions to food or to insect stings. Gupta’s study found that epinephrine was administered to 35 children and three adults in Chicago public schools during the 2012-13 school year. “We were surprised to see that of those who received the epinephrine, more than half of the reactions were first-time incidents,” Gupta said. “Many children are trying foods for the first time at school, and therefore it is critical that schools are prepared for a possible anaphylactic reaction.”  Forty-one states have laws recommending schools stock epinephrine, according to the article.

Matt Wray, PhD, MA, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus, writes in Medical Xpress that when it comes to preventing suicides, it’s important to focus some attention on how a person seeks to end his or her life. According to the article, suicide-prevention research has shown that when people who have begun to act on suicidal impulses find that access to their chosen method is blocked, many do not seek out other means. “Most people don’t have a backup plan,” Wray writes. “So when their initial attempt is stalled, the destructive impulse often passes. Moreover, contrary to what many believe, people who attempt suicide more than once are rare. Less than 10 percent of those who survive an attempt ever end up dying by suicide.”

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